I’ve posted previously about the progress on my second painting. Well, I’ve now completed it! (please click on the image to make it larger and clearer)

Underworld - acrylic on canvas
Underworld – acrylic on canvas

I call this piece Underworld. I started with a thick black gesso layer and then built up textured layers of acrylic tinted impasto. I prepared washes for some of these textured sections and then used a drybush technique to add further visual dimension. Overall, I’m quite happy with it. I think it’s more cohesive than my first piece, and I was directed by clearer internal guidelines. So, what have I learned?

  • I still really like the textural qualities of hogshair brushes!
  • I need to persevere with additional drybrush layers to build more visual dimension.
  • I need to strike a better balance between structure and serendipitous embellishments.
  • I should always apply an isolation layer before varnishing.
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Underworld : a finished abstract painting
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12 thoughts on “Underworld : a finished abstract painting

  • March 20, 2015 at 12:34 am
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    Hi @maesha-shannon šŸ™‚ Well, of course you’re drawn to the touch. After all, there’s a texture and sensuality to all brush strokes; and it’s as close as one can get to the aforementioned master, bar inventing a time machine. If I could have touched the engravings of Willam Blake that I once saw in a gallery, I would have. By the way, you’d be welcome to touch any of my paintings šŸ™‚

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    • March 20, 2015 at 12:35 am
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      Thank you @sirpamononen . That means a lot :heart:

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  • March 18, 2015 at 7:41 pm
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    I’m sorry I don’t understand art that well šŸ™ but I’ve been looking at this piece for 10 minutes now, and… It has this certain PULL towards it. I don’t know what it is but I’m kind of mesmerized..

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    • March 20, 2015 at 12:31 am
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      Hi @abeeha-mahmood ! I really appreciate you taking the time to look at it. I’m not even sure what understanding art means! I will say that since I started more seriously into photography a few years ago, that my eye for the visual has changed.Translating it to the page or canvas is another story entirely, and I can only hope that something works! Again, thank you.

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    • March 18, 2015 at 1:28 pm
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      Thanks @maesha-shannon šŸ™‚ I always appreciate your views.

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      • March 18, 2015 at 2:08 pm
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        May I ask where ‘Underworld’ came from? Not sure if you’ve already answered this somewhere. :/ If it’s too personal don’t feel you need to answer.

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        • March 18, 2015 at 2:28 pm
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          Hi @maesha-shannon . Primarily the driver was emotional at the time, though it’s also interesting how fortunate marks on a canvas can also be seen in a certain way and reinforce, and even extend this initial impulse. Ssee the line of white marks on an earlier stage of the piece: http://sjp.id.au/abstract-painting/acrylic-abstract-learning-progress/
          They suggested to me a Urizen-like character; a cabal of nefarious Kings at the centre of a world. In the end, I had to paint over them to maintain the integrity of the piece, but I will admit that this initial reinforcement remained with me to the end and strongly suggested some sort of stygian vision. It’s not clear in this rather average photo, but the painting benefits from an up-close view and touch because there are plenty of details contained within the layers.
          I trust this goes some way to answering your question !

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          • March 18, 2015 at 2:34 pm
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            Absolutely! I’ll have a look back and keep those thoughts in mind as I see the progressions again. šŸ™‚ Speaking of touching paintings, I was almost thrown out of the National Gallery of Canada for touching a Picasso! I was in my 20’s and I was completely enamoured… drawn in across the velvet rope. Out went my hand, and along came a guard. One’s fingers are inevitably itchy to feel the surface of a dried brush stroke. It’s one of my most brutal compulsions.

  • March 18, 2015 at 9:28 am
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    Very nice and interesting when one contemplates for a time. Its a look inside your brain.

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